George Brassai ~ The Need Of Passion
In the absence of a subject with which you are passionately involved, and without the excitement that drives you to grasp it and exhaust it, you may take some beautiful pictures, but not a photographic oeuvre.
GEORGE BRASSAI

passers-by in the rain , 1935
Lewis Mumford ~ On Mystery
A day spent without the sight or sound of beauty, the contemplation of mystery, or the search of truth or perfection is a poverty-stricken day; and a succession of such days is fatal to human life.
Lewis Mumford
Lewis Mumford (October 19, 1895 – January 26, 1990) was an American historian, philosopher of technology, and influential literary critic.
Francisco Goya ~ You Will Not Escape / No Te Escaparas
She who wants to be caught never escapes ~ Nunca se escapa la qe. se quiere dejar coger.Goya - Los Caprichos
Oskar Kokoschka ~ Dreams And Visions
True dreams and visions should be as visible to the artist as the phenomena of the objective world.
Oskar Kokoschka
Egon Schiele ~ A Melancholic Soul
Everything is dead while it lives.
Egon Schiele
Andrew Wyeth ~ Paintings Created Subconsciously
I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
Andrew Wyeth
Bird's nest
Andrew Wyeth Pennsylvania, USA - 12th of July, 1917 /2009
Famous Andrew Wyeth paintings include realist works of rural scenes, usually with a figure, object, or animal in it. His unusual compositions tend to add to the understated drama of his work.
Edgar Allan Poe ~ Dying
"I felt that my senses were leaving me. The sentence, the dread sentence of death, was the last of distinct accentuation which reached my ears"
Edgar Allan Poe ~ The Pit and the Pendulum
The Pit and the Pendulum is a claustrophobic tale of horror and suspense with an overpowering atmosphere of dread that has prompted much discussion about the writer's mental state. We could consider this masterpiece though as a compelling work of a gifted imagination.

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Goya ~ Witches' Sabbath
Witches' Sabbath is a 1798 oil on canvas by the Spanish artist Francisco Goya . Goya used the imagery of covens of witches in a number of works, most notably in one of his  Black Paintings, Witches Sabbath or The Great He-Goat(1821–1823) which contains similar sharp political and social overtones. At the time, a bitter struggle raged in Spain between liberals and those in favour of a church and a royalist-lead state
Witches' Sabbath shows the devil in the form of a garlanded goat, surrounded by a coven of disfigured, young and aging witches in a moonlit barren landscape. The goat possesses large horns and is crowned by a wreath of oak leaves. An old witch holds an emaciated infant in her hands. The devil seems to be acting as priest at an initiation ceremony for the child, though popular superstition at the time believed the devil often fed on children and human foetuses. The skeletons of two infants can be seen; one discarded to the left, the other held by a crone in the centre foreground.
The English word “sabbat” came indirectly from Hebrew (שַׁבָּת). In Hebrew it means “to cease” or “to rest”. In Judaism Shabbath is the rest day celebrated on Saturday. In connection with the Medieval popularity of the belief that Jews worship the Devil, satanic gatherings of witches were called “sabbats” or synagogues. The latter is a Jewish places of worship, much like a church. Alternately, some Christians were accused of Judaizing. Christian Sabbathkeepers, who never accepted Emperor Constantine's edict in 321 A.D., the first enforcing Christian worship on Sunday rather than on Sabbath, were demonized and accused of witchcraft; hence, the accusatory nomenclature, "witches' sabbath."
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Goya ~ Witches’ Sabbath
Witches' Sabbath is a 1798 oil on canvas by the Spanish artist Francisco Goya . Goya used the imagery of covens of witches in a number of works, most notably in one of his  Black Paintings, Witches Sabbath or The Great He-Goat(1821–1823) which contains similar sharp political and social overtones. At the time, a bitter struggle raged in Spain between liberals and those in favour of a church and a royalist-lead state
Witches' Sabbath shows the devil in the form of a garlanded goat, surrounded by a coven of disfigured, young and aging witches in a moonlit barren landscape. The goat possesses large horns and is crowned by a wreath of oak leaves. An old witch holds an emaciated infant in her hands. The devil seems to be acting as priest at an initiation ceremony for the child, though popular superstition at the time believed the devil often fed on children and human foetuses. The skeletons of two infants can be seen; one discarded to the left, the other held by a crone in the centre foreground.
The English word “sabbat” came indirectly from Hebrew (שַׁבָּת). In Hebrew it means “to cease” or “to rest”. In Judaism Shabbath is the rest day celebrated on Saturday. In connection with the Medieval popularity of the belief that Jews worship the Devil, satanic gatherings of witches were called “sabbats” or synagogues. The latter is a Jewish places of worship, much like a church. Alternately, some Christians were accused of Judaizing. Christian Sabbathkeepers, who never accepted Emperor Constantine's edict in 321 A.D., the first enforcing Christian worship on Sunday rather than on Sabbath, were demonized and accused of witchcraft; hence, the accusatory nomenclature, "witches' sabbath."
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Brancusi ~ The Essence Of Things
What is real is not the external form, but the essence of things . . . it is impossible for anyone to express anything essentially real by imitating its exterior surface.
Constantin Brancusi