Primo Levi ~ God Does Not Exist
" I must say that the experience of Auschwitz for me was such as to sweep away any remnants of the religious education that I had had...Auschwitz existed, therefore God cannot exist. I find no solution to that dilemma. I seek a solution, but I don't find it. "
Primo Levi
William Faulkner ~ I’m A Failed Poet
“I’m a failed poet. Maybe every novelist wants to write poetry first, finds he can’t and then tries the short story which is the most demanding form after poetry. And failing that, only then does he take up novel writing.”
—William Faulkner
Marcel Proust ~ Childhood And Books
"There are perhaps no days of our childhood we lived so fully as those we spent with a favorite book."
Marcel Proust
George Bernard Shaw ~ The Value Of Art
"Without art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable."
George Bernard Shaw
Ingeborg Bachmann ~ A Lost Sense Of Belonging Somewhere
“She wondered all the same how much they really had to say to one another, given that they had only this city in common and a similar way of talking, the same intonation, perhaps she'd just wanted to believe after that third whiskey on the roof garden at the Hilton that he would give her back something she'd lost, a missing taste, an intonation gone flat, that ghostly feeling of home, though she was no longer at home anywhere.”
― Ingeborg Bachmann, Simultan: Erzählungen
Antoine De Saint-exupery ~ Hymn To The Rose
“You're beautiful, but you're empty...One couldn't die for you. Of course, an ordinary passerby would think my rose looked just like you. But my rose, all on her own, is more important than all of you together, since she's the one I've watered. Since she's the one I put under glass, since she's the one I sheltered behind the screen. Since she's the one for whom I killed the caterpillars (except the two or three butterflies). Since she's the one I listened to when she complained, or when she boasted, or even sometimes when she said nothing at all. Since she's my rose.”
― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

Painting by John Duncan 
Hymn to the Rose (1907)
Vladimir Nabokov ~ A Good Book
"Knowing you have something good to read before bed is among the most pleasurable of sensations"
Vladimir Nabokov




Photograph of a young Nabokov with butterfly doodles by himself.
Eudora Welty ~ The Thousand Lives Of A Reader
“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.”
Eudora Welty
Photo above Eudora Welty in the garden, weeding, in the 1940s. Photograph via Eudora Welty Foundation.

Eudora Alice Welty (1909 - 2001) was an American author of short stories and novels about the American South. Her novel The Optimist's Daughter won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
Edith Wharton ~ Loneliness
"The real loneliness is living among all these kind people who only ask one to pretend!”
― Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

Edith Wharton (1862-1937)was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930.
Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York, a time when society people “dreaded scandal more than disease.”
Tolstoy ~ Men Are Like Rivers…
“One of the most widespread superstitions is that every man has his own special, definite qualities; that a man is kind, cruel, wise, stupid, energetic, apathetic, etc.
Men are not like that . . . Men are like rivers; the water is the same in each, and alike in all; but every river is narrow here, is more rapid there, here slower, there broader, now clear, now cold, now dull, now warm. It is the same with men. Every man carries in himself the germs of every human quality and sometimes one manifests itself, sometimes another, and the man often becomes unlike himself—while still remaining the same man.”
― Leo Tolstoy

Only known color photograph of the writer, taken at his Yasnaya Polyana estate in 1908 by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky