Antoine De Saint-exupery ~ Hymn To The Rose
“You're beautiful, but you're empty...One couldn't die for you. Of course, an ordinary passerby would think my rose looked just like you. But my rose, all on her own, is more important than all of you together, since she's the one I've watered. Since she's the one I put under glass, since she's the one I sheltered behind the screen. Since she's the one for whom I killed the caterpillars (except the two or three butterflies). Since she's the one I listened to when she complained, or when she boasted, or even sometimes when she said nothing at all. Since she's my rose.”
― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

Painting by John Duncan 
Hymn to the Rose (1907)
Vladimir Nabokov ~ A Good Book
"Knowing you have something good to read before bed is among the most pleasurable of sensations"
Vladimir Nabokov




Photograph of a young Nabokov with butterfly doodles by himself.
Eudora Welty ~ The Thousand Lives Of A Reader
“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.”
Eudora Welty
Photo above Eudora Welty in the garden, weeding, in the 1940s. Photograph via Eudora Welty Foundation.

Eudora Alice Welty (1909 - 2001) was an American author of short stories and novels about the American South. Her novel The Optimist's Daughter won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
Edith Wharton ~ Loneliness
"The real loneliness is living among all these kind people who only ask one to pretend!”
― Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

Edith Wharton (1862-1937)was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930.
Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York, a time when society people “dreaded scandal more than disease.”
Tolstoy ~ Men Are Like Rivers…
“One of the most widespread superstitions is that every man has his own special, definite qualities; that a man is kind, cruel, wise, stupid, energetic, apathetic, etc.
Men are not like that . . . Men are like rivers; the water is the same in each, and alike in all; but every river is narrow here, is more rapid there, here slower, there broader, now clear, now cold, now dull, now warm. It is the same with men. Every man carries in himself the germs of every human quality and sometimes one manifests itself, sometimes another, and the man often becomes unlike himself—while still remaining the same man.”
― Leo Tolstoy

Only known color photograph of the writer, taken at his Yasnaya Polyana estate in 1908 by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky
Anna Kavan ~ Life As A Result Of Tension
"Life is tension or the result of tension; without tension the creative impulse cannot exist. If human life be taken as the result of tension between the two polarities night and day, night, the negative pole, must share equal importance with the positive day. At night, under the influence of cosmic radiations quite different from those of the day, human affairs are apt to come to a crisis. At night most human beings die and are born."

Anna Kavan

Anna Kavan (Helen Woods, 1901-1968) was a British novelist, short story writer and painter.
F. Scott Fitzgerald ~ The Beauty Of Literature
"That is part of the beauty of all literature. You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you're not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Leo Tolstoy ~ Spring
“Spring is the time of plans and projects.”
Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912)
Spring Flowers
Oil on panel
Anais Nin ~ Why Do We Write?
“We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.”
― Anaïs Nin
Virginia Woolf ~ Counting Up
“Often on a wet day I begin counting up; what I've read and what I haven't read.” 
Virginia Woolf,  Between the Acts