Leo Tolstoy ~ Spring
“Spring is the time of plans and projects.”
Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912)
Spring Flowers
Oil on panel
Anais Nin ~ Why Do We Write?
“We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.”
― Anaïs Nin
Virginia Woolf ~ Counting Up
“Often on a wet day I begin counting up; what I've read and what I haven't read.” 
Virginia Woolf,  Between the Acts
Saul Bellow ~ Writing At Night
“You never have to change anything you got up in the middle of the night to write.”
Saul Bellow
A True Sentence
"I would stand and look out over the roofs of Paris and think, "Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know."
Ernest Hemingway
The Need Of A Woman
“I, with a deeper instinct, choose a man who compels my strength, who makes enormous demands on me, who does not doubt my courage or my toughness, who does not believe me naïve or innocent, who has the courage to treat me like a woman.”
― Anaïs Nin
Portrait of Anne
André Lhote - 1930
The Butterfly Of Brassai And Keats…
“I almost wish we were butterflies and liv'd but three summer days - three such days with you I could fill with more delight than fifty common years could ever contain.”
― John Keats, Bright Star: Love Letters and Poems of John Keats to Fanny Brawne

Jules Brassai
Papillon à la bougie, 1933
Frida Kahlo – Nothing Is Absolute
“Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything revolves, everything flies and goes away.”
― Frida Kahlo

Anonymous photographer:
Frida Kahlo in the Casa Azul, 1930

www.moniquespassions.com
Anna Akhmatova
You will hear thunder and remember me,
And think: she wanted storms. The rim
Of the sky will be the colour of hard crimson,
And your heart, as it was then, will be on fire.”
― Anna Akhmatova, The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova
Ivan Kramskoy – Russian Painter Of Real Life
Ivan Kramskoy
Portrait of the Philosopher Vladimir Solovyov, 1885
"The meaning and worth of love, as a feeling, is that it really forces us, with all our being, to acknowledge for ANOTHER the same absolute central significance which, because of the power of our egoism, we are conscious of only in our own selves. Love is important not as one of our feelings, but as the transfer of all our interest in life from ourselves to another, as the shifting of the very centre of our personal life. This is characteristic of every kind of love, but predominantly of sexual love; it is distinguished from other kinds of love by greater intensity, by a more engrossing character, and by the possibility of a more complete overall reciprocity. Only this love can lead to the real and indissoluble union of two lives into one; only of it do the words of Holy Writ say: 'They shall be one flesh,' i.e., shall become one real being.”
― Vladimir S. Solovyov, The Meaning of Love