Pissarro ~ The Wish Of An Artist
"Painting, art in general, enchants me. It is my life. What else matters? When you put all your soul into a work, all that is noble in you, you cannot fail to find a kindred soul who understands you, and you do not need a host of such spirits. Is not that all an artist should wish for?"
Camille Pissarro

Camille Pissarro (1831 - 1903)
The Garden in Pontoise, 1877
John Everett Millais ~ Pre-raphaelite Painter
"I may honestly say that I have never consciously placed an idle touch upon canvas..."
John Everett Millais (1829 - 1896)

Ophelia, 1851-1852

Portrait of a Girl (Sophie Gray), 1857
Edith Wharton ~ Loneliness
"The real loneliness is living among all these kind people who only ask one to pretend!”
― Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

Edith Wharton (1862-1937)was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930.
Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York, a time when society people “dreaded scandal more than disease.”
Vincent Van Gogh ~ Paintings Are Everywhere
"What am I in the eyes of most people — a nonentity, an eccentric, or an unpleasant person — somebody who has no position in society and will never have; in short, the lowest of the low. All right, then — even if that were absolutely true, then I should one day like to show by my work what such an eccentric, such a nobody, has in his heart. That is my ambition, based less on resentment than on love in spite of everything, based more on a feeling of serenity than on passion. Though I am often in the depths of misery, there is still calmness, pure harmony and music inside me. I see paintings or drawings in the poorest cottages, in the dirtiest corners. And my mind is driven towards these things with an irresistible momentum.”
― Vincent van Gogh
Vincent van Gogh, 1866

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890)
Trees in the Asylum Garden, 1889.
Henri Matisse ~ We Belong To Our Time
“...for whether we want to or not, we belong to our time and we share in its opinions, its feelings, even its delusions.”
― Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse at work on his Cut-Outs at his home in Nice, 1953

Photo Paris Match via Getty Image

Henri Matisse, The Reader, Marguerite Matisse
Robert Doisneau ~ The Absorbent Photographer
"If you take photographs, don’t speak, don’t write, don’t analyse yourself, and don’t answer any questions."
Robert Doisneau

Robert Doisneau, 1950
Pierre Auguste Renoir ~ Beauty And Art
"To my mind, a picture should be something pleasant, cheerful, and pretty, yes pretty! There are too many unpleasant things in life as it is without creating still more of them.”
Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Camille Monet and her son Jean in the Garden at Argenteuil, 1874.
Pierre Auguste Renoir
Francis Bacon ~ Imagination
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not..."
Francis Bacon (1909-1992)

Study for the Nurse in the Battleship Potemkin, 1957.
Tolstoy ~ Men Are Like Rivers…
“One of the most widespread superstitions is that every man has his own special, definite qualities; that a man is kind, cruel, wise, stupid, energetic, apathetic, etc.
Men are not like that . . . Men are like rivers; the water is the same in each, and alike in all; but every river is narrow here, is more rapid there, here slower, there broader, now clear, now cold, now dull, now warm. It is the same with men. Every man carries in himself the germs of every human quality and sometimes one manifests itself, sometimes another, and the man often becomes unlike himself—while still remaining the same man.”
― Leo Tolstoy

Only known color photograph of the writer, taken at his Yasnaya Polyana estate in 1908 by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky
George Wesley Bellows ~ The Ideal Artist
"The ideal artist...retains his experience in a spirit of wonder and feeds it with creative lust."
George Wesley Bellows (1882-1925)
A Day in June, 1913