Claude Monet ~ The Value Of The Surrounding Atmosphere
'For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment; but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life - the air and the light, which vary continuously. For me, it is only the surrounding atmosphere which gives subjects their true value.'
Claude Monet
The Seine at Port-Villez
La Seine à Port-Villez
Eudora Welty ~ The Thousand Lives Of A Reader
“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.”
Eudora Welty
Photo above Eudora Welty in the garden, weeding, in the 1940s. Photograph via Eudora Welty Foundation.

Eudora Alice Welty (1909 - 2001) was an American author of short stories and novels about the American South. Her novel The Optimist's Daughter won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
Edgar Degas ~ Art And Mystery
“A painting requires a little mystery, some vagueness, and some fantasy. When you always make your meaning perfectly plain you end up boring people”
Edgar Degas

The Dance Class (La Classe de Danse),

Edgar Degas,
"Four Dancers," 1899.
Auguste Rodin ~ Nature Versus Art
What is commonly called ugliness in nature can in art become full of beauty.
Auguste Rodin
Pissarro ~ The Wish Of An Artist
"Painting, art in general, enchants me. It is my life. What else matters? When you put all your soul into a work, all that is noble in you, you cannot fail to find a kindred soul who understands you, and you do not need a host of such spirits. Is not that all an artist should wish for?"
Camille Pissarro

Camille Pissarro (1831 - 1903)
The Garden in Pontoise, 1877
John Everett Millais ~ Pre-raphaelite Painter
"I may honestly say that I have never consciously placed an idle touch upon canvas..."
John Everett Millais (1829 - 1896)

Ophelia, 1851-1852

Portrait of a Girl (Sophie Gray), 1857
Edith Wharton ~ Loneliness
"The real loneliness is living among all these kind people who only ask one to pretend!”
― Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

Edith Wharton (1862-1937)was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930.
Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York, a time when society people “dreaded scandal more than disease.”
Vincent Van Gogh ~ Paintings Are Everywhere
"What am I in the eyes of most people — a nonentity, an eccentric, or an unpleasant person — somebody who has no position in society and will never have; in short, the lowest of the low. All right, then — even if that were absolutely true, then I should one day like to show by my work what such an eccentric, such a nobody, has in his heart. That is my ambition, based less on resentment than on love in spite of everything, based more on a feeling of serenity than on passion. Though I am often in the depths of misery, there is still calmness, pure harmony and music inside me. I see paintings or drawings in the poorest cottages, in the dirtiest corners. And my mind is driven towards these things with an irresistible momentum.”
― Vincent van Gogh
Vincent van Gogh, 1866

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890)
Trees in the Asylum Garden, 1889.
Henri Matisse ~ We Belong To Our Time
“...for whether we want to or not, we belong to our time and we share in its opinions, its feelings, even its delusions.”
― Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse at work on his Cut-Outs at his home in Nice, 1953

Photo Paris Match via Getty Image

Henri Matisse, The Reader, Marguerite Matisse
Robert Doisneau ~ The Absorbent Photographer
"If you take photographs, don’t speak, don’t write, don’t analyse yourself, and don’t answer any questions."
Robert Doisneau

Robert Doisneau, 1950