Oskar Kokoschka ~ Dreams And Visions
True dreams and visions should be as visible to the artist as the phenomena of the objective world.
Oskar Kokoschka
Brett Whiteley ~ The Meaning Of Existence
The fine art of painting, which is the bastard of alchemy, always has been always will be, a game. The rules of the game are quite simple: in a given arena, on as many psychic fronts as the talent allows, one must visually describe, the centre of the meaning of existence.
Brett Whiteley (Australian artist, 1939-1992)
Mark Rothko ~ The Essence Of Academicism
It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing.
Mark Rothko
Brancusi ~ The Essence Of Things
What is real is not the external form, but the essence of things . . . it is impossible for anyone to express anything essentially real by imitating its exterior surface.
Constantin Brancusi
James Ensor ~ On His Art
"My art tends toward the literary. My pictures tend toward the outskirts of painting: But why generalize? It is possible to realize one thing or another, according to the impressions gained from one point of view or another. But it is too difficult to make a general rule."
-- James Ensor
Photo James Ensor and Ernest Rousseau on the beach near Oostende (Belgium) ca. 1892
James Ensor, Masks Confronting Death (1888)
Georgia O'keeffe ~ On Painting
"So I said to myself-I'll paint what I see-what the flower is to me but I'll paint it big and they will be surprised into taking the time to look at it-I will make even busy New Yorkers take time to see what I see of flowers."
Georgia O'Keeffe on Painting
Georgia O’keeffe ~ On Painting
"So I said to myself-I'll paint what I see-what the flower is to me but I'll paint it big and they will be surprised into taking the time to look at it-I will make even busy New Yorkers take time to see what I see of flowers."
Georgia O'Keeffe on Painting
Edward Burne-jones ~ The Depths Of The Sea
The Depths of the Sea (1887) by Sir Edward Burne-Jones
Two weighless figures are buoyed up by the water surrounding them in this unusual underwaterview. Pre-Raphaelite painters such as Burne-Jones were fascinated with drowning; this preoccupution, part of a general preference for morbid subjects, was also popular with Art Nouveau.
Moore ~ On Paintings
"The many great paintings of the world, all make the point as clear as possible:
The soul cannot thrive in the absence of art. If you don't want the pleasure of art, you are not human; and if you are not human, you don't have a soul."
Georges Braque ~ Mystery Of Art
"There is only one valuable thing in art: the thing you cannot explain."
Georges Braque