Javier Aliste ~ Painter Of Magical Subconsciousnesses
The artist Javier Aliste searches for the syncretism of our current cultural identity. To find his answers he has been researching the Andean world and the idiosyncrasies of the Amazonian people since 1997. In his work of art he uses sacred chromatic and sacred symbolism, which is inspired on the way people live in South America typically Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Chile.

Using his heritage of the South American continent - Javier was born in Chile and living in Buenos Aires - where art has always been a mixture of Andean symbols and a medieval European concept he evolved and managed to create his own unique style; a typical palet of colors combined with different materials such as plastic tablecloths, synthetic enamel, plaster and clothes. The result is a expressive vivid art form that tributes the South American culture.

The first time I saw the works of Javier Aliste I was struck by its happiness it gave me… I loved the colorful, bright three dimensional image it represented because of the material he uses. It is totally different from what I saw before working as an art dealer and I was surprised by its symbolic details. His works are in some way reminding me of my childhood innocence in which I appreciated art just by looking at it without having the necessity to explain why I like it. Just looking at it and knowing that I like it.  The naive art of Javier Aliste is provoking this same sensation.

It seems to me that Javier gets part of his creative inspiration from the combination of materials he utilizes and applies. The artistic excitement seems to lie most of all in its preoccupation with the invention and use such materials, colors, and surfaces.  I can see the influence of his childhood, it is pure art, pure thoughts…where the subconscious plays an important role.

Its like capturing the beauty of landscape rather than focusing on a single detail.

This is exactly what I see in the works of Javier, it is not the image per se which is asking our attention but the work as a whole with the underlying message within that shows details by looking at its whole. Understanding the works of Javier by undergoing his South American identity, we can hear the whispers of the Gods, we look at his works and we can feel them…

What I can clearly see as well is the medieval European cultural influences and religion combined which has evolved into a true spiritual South American style. Those color mixtures and symbolic combinations allows him to represents a reality that surrounds him, but he is also expressing strong feelings that come from inside. Of course Javier himself is a part of his South American cultural heritage and he is mixing this heritage with his experience he gained in Europe. He studied in Art in Germany and traveled through Europe before he returned to his home place.

An Andean concept mixed with this strong European influence. It is almost if we can hear the ancestors voices coming out of his artworks.

Then of course there is always the question, does this art really need to be explained or should we just enjoy en let our subconscious take over allowing each of its viewers to experience and explore Javier Aliste's subconscious works of art.

Monique Lucy Weberink -  President My Passion For…
Teresa Wilms Montt ~ “to Die, After Feeling Everything And Being Nothing…”
TERESA WILMS MONTT  POET FROM CHILE (Viña del Mar, 1893 – París 1921): She was born in a wealthy family, daughter of Federico Guillermo Wilms Montt and Brieba, and his wife Luz Victoria Montt and Montt. Given the social context of that time, her primary instruction was given to her by governesses and particular teachers.
When Teresa turned 17, she got married with Gustavo Balmaceda Valdés. In the following years (1911 y 1913) she gave birth to her daughters, Elisa and Silvia Luz. Almost right after the wedding, the problems between Gustavo and Teresa started, mainly due to how much the husband felt aggravated by his wife’s personality, who frequently attended to literary gatherings, and followed the anarchist ideals, and free masonry. Gustavo reacted sheltering himself in the gambling and alcohol; Teresa, on her side, sheltered herself in her friend and Gustavo’s cousin, Vicente Balmaceda Zañartu (whom she will refer on the future at her diaries as Jean).
After numerous marital conflicts, moving from one city to another and letters from Vicente Balmaceda addressed to Teresa, Gustavo Balmaceda convened a family trial, which contaminated her confinement in the convent of Preciosa Sangre, which she entered on October 18th of 1915, and escaped from it on June of 1916 setting off for Buenos Aires, helped by Vicente Huidobro. During her stay in the convent, she started a journal, in which she wrote her feelings about the loss of her daughters, being separated from Vicente Balmaceda and the motivations for her first suicide attempt on March 29th, 1916.
In Buenos Aires, she contributed to Nosotros magazines, in which also did contributed Gabriela Mistral and Ángel Cruchaga Santa María, among others. She also published her first work “Inquietudes Sentimentales”, a collection of fifty poems with surrealistic threads, that enjoyed an amazing success among the intellectual circles of Buenos Aires society. the same happened to “Los Tres Cantos”, work that explored eroticism and spirituality.
Two years after this work and after traveling to Barcelona and New York, she came back to Buenos Aires and published “Cuentos para Hombres que Todavía son Niños”. In it she evoked her childhood and some vital experiences, in tales of great originality and fantasy. “En la Inquietud del Mármol” was published in Barcelona and constituted a lyric toned elegy, made of 35 fragments, which central leitmotif was death. Written on first person, she focused her interest on the mediating role of love between life and death.
She continued traveling across Europe, visiting London and Paris, but always being a resident of Madrid. In 1920 she was reunited with her daughters in Paris; but after they were separated she become gravely ill. In this crisis, she consumed a large dose of Barbital , and she died on December 24th 1921.
In the last pages of her diary, she wrote: “To die, after feeling everything and being nothing…”.

Source count of the Moon
Hector Salgado ~ Colorful Painter
MONIQUE
UNA FLOR  SE DESPERTO EN TU SOÑAR
VIAJANDO ENTRE ESTRELLAS Y SUSPIROS

TU, FRENTE A UN ESPEJO

PURA E INOCENTE
EN UN CAMINO DE MARES
CON TU SONRISA DE NIÑA
CON TU PIEL DE MUJER
LAGRIMAS Y COLORES
SENTADA EN LA PLAYA,
TERNURA DE TU ALMA
UNIVERSO DE MIRADAS
SENTIMIENTOS...................
PINCELES TROVADORES
QUE DANZAN A TU LADO
QUE CANTAN EN TU CORAZON
MI MONIQUE, MI MUJER,
AMANECER DE NUESTRO AMOR
UNA MANO TE ESPERA
MI AMOR TE ACOMPAÑA
SINTIENDO TU RESPIRAR
TU PALPITAR, TU DESEAR...
Hector Salgado
Chile, 2011
Gabriela Mistral ~ Dusk
DUSK
I feel my heart melting
in the mildness like candles
my veins are slow oil
and not wine,
and I feel my life fleeing
hushed and gentle like the gazelle.
Gabriela Mistral
(April 7, 1889 – January 10, 1957 / Vicuna / Chile)
Pablo Neruda ~ On His Poetry
I grew up in this town, my poetry was born between the hill and the river, it took its voice from the rain, and like the timber, it steeped itself in the forests.
~Pablo Neruda, quoted in Wall Street Journal,, 14 November 1985